Rebellion in Nicaragua

In this first of a two part series we interview three guests looking at the recent rebellion in Nicaragua which began in April 2018 as a series of student protests in the capital of Managua and snowballed into a several month nationwide rebellion. Our three guests are either Nicaraguan or Nicaraguan-American and each share their different insights on the rebellion. 

Mark is from the primarily indigenous and Black Atlantic/Caribbean coast region of Nicaragua and has deep family ties to the Sandinista movement. Miranda lives back and forth between the US and Nicaragua and was a student in Managua during the rebellion and authored several pieces about his direct participation. Tanya is a Los Angeles based artist, photographer, and member of Black Rose/Rosa Negra, who comes from a Sandinista family. 

Part two of this interview will be released in two weeks. We apologize for the delay in releasing these episodes and wanted to thank everyone for their support and patience. We have some great content lined up to kick off 2020. 

Links and resources:

Between Rum and Bullets podcast with Mark and Miranda

Recent events:

Siege of Nicaragua’s Catholic Cathedral Eases as Hunger Strikers Leave – Nov 19, 2019

Recommend background articles:

One Million Hands Flourishing: Nicaragua and the Neverending Task of Planting by Tanya H.F.

It’s No Longer About Social Security: Inside the Nicaraguan Student Protests by Miranda

Capitalist Development in Nicaragua and the Mirage of the Left by William I. Robinson

Women in the Revolution: The Forgotten History of Las Sandinistas by La Virgen

The Sandinista Labor Paradox by Jonah Walters, NACLA

2 comments on Rebellion in Nicaragua

  1. A says:

    I didn’t know anything about the history of this struggle. Very informative. I look forward to the second episode.

  2. Netzahuatl1 says:

    Excellent!
    Specially the part on the Caribbean, very informative!
    You should try to do it in Spanish.
    The feminist movement is much more complex that showed here. Maybe a piece on Nicaraguan feminism?

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